USC’s offensive line hit with injuries at Washington State – Orange County Register

PULLMAN, Wash. — Amid a rash of injuries, USC was also without its starting left tackle Toa Lobendahn against Washington State on Friday night.

Lobendahn did not travel with the team, remaining in Los Angeles. The website USCFootball.com first reported that he was out with a staph infection, though he had practiced during the week.

Clayton Johnston, a redshirt sophomore, started in his place, while freshman Austin Jackson also rotated.

During training camp, Johnston saw a bulk of the reps at left tackle with the first-team offense, while Lobendahn also practiced at center.

Lobendahn, a redshirt junior, has been limited because of knee injuries in the past two seasons, twice undergoing season-ending knee surgeries for torn ligaments.

Late in the first quarter on Friday, starting right tackle Chuma Edoga left with an apparent leg injury. As he walked off the field, assisted by trainers, he could not put weight on his left leg.

Right guard Viane Talamaivao was also sidelined during the second quarter with an apparent injury to his left shoulder.

With the three starters sidelined before halftime, the Trojans used Jackson at left tackle, Johnston at right tackle and freshman Andrew Vorhees at right guard to replace Talamaivao.

BACKFIELD BOOST

Junior running back Ronald Jones, who was out in the Trojans’ win at Cal last Saturday because of a thigh contusion and a sprained ankle, returned against the Cougars.

He showed few lingering effects.

Early in the second quarter, Jones ran untouched 86 yards for a touchdown, giving USC a 14-10 lead and eclipsing 100 yards before halftime.

It was also the longest run by a USC running back since LaVale Woods’ school-record 96-yard run in 1996.

LATE-NIGHT REGRETS?

The matchup between USC and Washington State has been the Pac-12’s most high-profile contest so far this season, with the teams ranked No. 5 and No. 16 in the Associated Press poll.

The game didn’t kick off, however, until nearly 8 p.m. PT, a very late start…

Read the full article at the Original Source..

Back to Top