Vistogard® and Voraxaze® Added to Revised Guidelines for Stocking of Antidotes in US Hospitals

PHILADELPHIA, September 13, 2017 /PRNewswire/ —

BTG plc (LSE: BTG), the global specialist healthcare company, announces the inclusion of two of its oncology-related antidote products in the revised ‘Expert Consensus Guidelines for Stocking of Antidotes in Hospitals That Provide Emergency Care’ published online by the Annals of Emergency Medicine (AEM).

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The previous version of the stocking guidelines was published in 2009, prior to the approval and availability of Voraxaze® (glucarpidase) and Vistogard® (uridine triacetate), which are used to reverse toxicities that can occur from particular chemotherapy treatments. These two BTG products have now been added to the guidance.

The recommendations have been updated by a multidisciplinary expert healthcare panel that have experience with the medical and logistical nature of using emergency care products to promptly treat patients exposed to a number of poisons. In total, 45 antidotes were considered and 44 were recommended for stocking, including the timeframe in which the products should be available to administer to patients.

Dr. Richard Dart, Director of the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center, states: “Many studies have shown that hospitals with emergency departments often fail to stock important antidotes. Our hope is that these guidelines will provide them the guidance needed to stock emergency antidotes appropriately.”

BTG’s Specialty Pharmaceuticals’ product portfolio includes four products categorized as antidotes designed for use in hospital settings and emergency rooms. BTG’s antidote products address conditions for which there are limited or no existing treatment options. They are listed below, along with the recommendation of the expert panel:

Acute care 

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