‘Tokyo Ghoul’ Review | Variety

A nerdy college boy is transformed into a half-human, half-monster hybrid in “Tokyo Ghoul,” an uneven live-action adaptation of Sui Ishida’s hit manga about flesh-eating creatures running amok in an alternate contemporary Japan. Stylishly decorated and generating all-important sympathy for a character living precariously in two worlds, director Kentaro Hagiwara’s feature debut gets the drama right but is let down by visual effects that are sometimes unconvincing. Given the massive global popularity of the manga and its spinoff anime series, “Tokyo Ghoul” should get off to a flying start when it opens domestically on July 29, followed by an international rollout in August (which could help build interest for a U.S. release tentatively planned later this fall by Funimation).

Before entering the dark domain of creatures that are indistinguishable from humans — until it’s too late — the images are bright and the tone is bouncy. Ken Kaneki (Masataka Kubota) is a shy university student who finally finds the courage to approach sweet and sensitive bookworm Rize (Yu Aoi, looking like she hasn’t aged a day since the 2006 charmer “Hula Girls”). Kubota’s boyish good looks and convincing performance as a bumbling nice guy ensures that Ken will have viewers on his side right from the start.

On the couple’s first date, mousey Rize suddenly becomes flesh-hungry Rize. After sinking her fangs into Ken, the girl is killed in a freak accident. Having barely survived the encounter, Ken is given a life-saving operation involving organ transplants from none other than Rize, the result being that he’s now a half-ghoul.

It’s only a matter of time before Ken starts craving human flesh and has no choice but to mix with ghouls who’ve infiltrated every level of Tokyo society. As with many tales of this type, there are good ghouls and bad ghouls. Attempting to co-exist as peacefully as possible with humans is Mr. Yoshimura (Kunio Marai),…

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