Surfer, 20, almost lost leg to stingray attack, surgeon says

Wildlife experts say stingray attacks are extremely rare, but Michael Goldstein, 20, of Palm Beach Gardens knows firsthand what it’s like.

Goldstein was surfing off Singer Island June 19, 2017 when he says he felt a sudden punch. It turned out to be the jab of a stingray.

“I was on my board and it just snuck up and got me,” Goldstein said.

He managed to make it back to the beach, where a jogger raced in and applied pressure to Goldstein’s leg until help arrived.

Goldstein was taken to St. Mary’s Medical Center.

“We caught it just in time, by the time he came to the ER and he had a cat scan and they called me, we had him in the operating room in 15 minutes,” said Dr. Eugene Misquith, a trauma surgeon at St. Mary’s Medical Center.

The two appeared together, to share Goldstein’s story. He says the stingray attack has not stopped him from wanting to continue surfing. In a few weeks, he hopes to get back in the water, once his leg heals fully.

The two appeared together, to share Goldstein’s story. He says the stingray attack has not stopped him from wanting to continue surfing. In a few weeks, he hopes to get back in the water, once his leg heals fully.

Stingrays are often found on the bottom of the ocean. Florida Fish and Wildlife says stingrays are often non-aggressive and little danger to humans, but they do have venomous barbs on the base of their tail.

To avoid being stabbed by a stingray, it’s recommended to do a “Stingray Shuffle”. That’s a manner of sliding your feet on the sandy bottom. This movement also creations vibrations that scare stingrays away.

Dr. Misquith says if you do get stabbed by a stingray you should follow basic first aid procedures, this includes applying pressure to the wound and lifting it above the level of the heart to stop the bleeding.

Most important, Dr. Misquith says, is if you are stabbed in the chest, you should not pull the barb out because it has…

Read the full article at the Original Source..

Back to Top