Now Available – Propyl Acetate Market Research Report 2016 to 2024 |

Propyl acetate, also known as propyl ethanoate, is an ester. It is clear, colorless liquid commonly used in fragrances and as a flavor additive. Normal propyl acetate (also known as n-propyl acetate or 1-propyl acetate) is an organic compound with the molecular formula C?H??O?. It is formed by the esterification of acetic acid and 1-propanol (known as condensation reaction), often using Fischer–Speier esterification process. In this reaction, sulfuric acid acts as a catalyst and water is produced as a byproduct. Propyl acetate is found in apples. It is a flavoring agent. It belongs to the family of carboxylic acid esters. These are carboxylic acid derivatives in which a carbon atom from the carbonyl group is attached to an alkyl or oaryl moiety through an oxygen atom (forming an ester group). Propyl acetate is used primarily as a solvent for liquid, rotogravure printing inks and flexographic printing inks. Its other applications include coatings, wood lacquers, aerosol sprays, nail care products, cosmetics, and fragrances. The solvency and thinnability of propyl acetate is comparable to ethyl acetate. It dissolves several natural and synthetic resins (for example, cellulose nitrate, acrylates, alkyl resins, plasticizers, waxes, oils, and fats) and is thus an extremely suitable solvent for wood lacquers and industrial finishes.

Propyl acetate is produced by direct esterification of the corresponding alcohol with acetic acid in the presence of sulfuric acid, p-toluenesulfonic acid, methanesulfonic acid, or a strong cationic resin used as a catalyst. 1-propanol can also undergo ester interchange with methyl acetate or ethyl acetate in the presence of a strong cationic exchange resin and produce n-propyl acetate. Propyl acetate is one of the organic solvents, collected in factories all over Japan and analyzed by gas chromatography. In liquid and vapor forms, propyl acetate is flammable. Propyl acetate vapors are explosive. They are heavier than air. They can…

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