New way to see artery damage before heart disease sets in

A newly-developed imaging methodology called FAI identifies inflamed artery lesions that pose the most risk to patients. Credit: A.S. Antonopoulos et al., Science Translational Medicine (2017)

Researchers have developed a new way to non-invasively peer into a person’s arteries, detect inflammation, and possibly ward off heart disease before it becomes too severe to treat, a study said Wednesday.

Heart disease is the top killer of men and women in the United States, accounting for one in four deaths nationwide. Each year, about 750,000 Americans have a .

For decades, doctors have relied on CT scans and angiograms to detect disease, a leading cause of heart attack.

These tests focus on finding vessels that are narrowing due to a buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, restricting blood flow to the heart. But they are far from perfect.

Often, patients with narrowed coronary arteries find out only when their condition is severe.

Nor is narrowing of the arteries always a signal of an approaching heart attack.

Instead, inflammation is the real culprit when it comes to triggering a blockage in an artery that leads to heart attack, said researcher Keith Channon, professor of cardiovascular medicine at the University of Oxford.

“Until now, there’s been no way to detect inflammation in the coronary arteries,” he told reporters on a conference call ahead of the release of the paper in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Mapping fat accumulation around the coronary artery with a new non-invasive imaging technique. Credit: A.S. Antonopoulos et al., Science Translational Medicine (2017)

“And this is where our new research…

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