Neuroscience Professor Bill Rebeck Talks Alzheimer’s Research

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY
Neuroscience professor Bill Rebeck received the President’s Award for Distinguished Scholar-Teachers at Georgetown University this year, earning a $10,000 grant towards his Alzheimer’s research.

Bill Rebeck, professor of neuroscience at Georgetown, doesn’t normally win things — or so he says.

Rebeck is one of three faculty recipients of the President’s Award for Distinguished Scholar-Teachers at Georgetown University this year, earning a $10,000 grant for three years to support his research of Alzheimer’s disease and the APOE gene in the university’s Laboratory of Aging and Neurodegeneration.

Rebeck, who has been with the university since 2003, heads the Laboratory of Aging and Neurodegeneration where he leads a group of graduate and undergraduate students researching Alzheimer’s disease.

In an interview with The Hoya, Rebeck discussed the importance of researching Alzheimer’s, as well as what he foresees for both the use of his grant and the future of Alzheimer’s research.


What does winning this award mean for you?

Well, I’m just happy to have won. I don’t win things.

What it really means, though, is that the university cares about our faculty taking research as seriously as we take teaching. It’s not so important that I was the one who received it, but that the award exists and that people are celebrated in achieving excellence in two very important domains of our jobs.


I know you lead the Laboratory of Aging and Neurodegeneration here at Georgetown, but how did you get involved with this field of study?

When I was graduating with my PhD, I had been studying something very different. I was studying DNA damage and bacteria. I was looking for a post-doctoral degree to go to, and I thought it was a good opportunity to try something new.

I got a Fulbright fellowship and I went to do research in Germany. I looked around for very different topics that I found interesting, and one of the labs I contacted worked on…

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