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When the weather turns brisk and fall is in the air, it’s the perfect time to curl up with a good book. We’ve picked 10 new releases that will captivate your imagination while you sip on some hot cocoa.
USA TODAY

There’s romance, friendship, melancholy and no shortage of quirky charm in Turtles All the Way Down, so John Green’s latest young-adult effort falls squarely in his ultra-popular wheelhouse. Where the anticipated new novel differentiates itself, though, is as a thoughtful look at mental illness and a debilitating obsessive-compulsive disorder that doesn’t ask but makes you feel the constant struggles of its main character.

Turtles (Dutton Books for Young Readers; 304 pp.; *** out of four), Green’s first book since his 2012 phenomenon The Fault in Our Stars, might not be his best but definitely feels like his most personal and passionate project. It’s part mystery, part love story, part coming-of-age journey, and has lots of strife for a young woman who can’t help feeling like the sidekick of her own existence. As 16-year-old Indianapolis youngster Aza Holmes figures, “I was beginning to learn that your life is a story told about you, not one that you tell.”

The Holmes moniker isn’t coincidental: She’s a quiet high school Sherlock intrigued by the case of a local billionaire Russell Pickett who goes on the lam after charges of corruption surface. Aza and her “Best and Most Fearless Friend” Daisy Ramirez decide to investigate since there’s a hefty $100,000 reward at stake for info on finding him. It also leads to a reconnection with Pickett’s son Davis, with whom Aza spent summer nights years ago staring up at the stars at “Sad Camp,” for kids with dead parents.

Aza’s heart still hurts from the death of her father years ago — she lovingly drives around his old…