Heartland Institute Experts Comment on Earth Day and March for Science

Isaac Orr

The demonstrators should formulate their hypotheses about the world, but be open to changing their world view if observed data do not support their initial position.

Saturday, April 22 is Earth Day, and also the day for the so-called “March for Science.” Thousands of people in cities across America will take to the streets, ostensibly to advocate for science-based public policy. The event, however, is expected to be more political than scientific.

The following statements from environmental policy experts at The Heartland Institute – a free-market think tank – may be used for attribution. For more comments, refer to the contact information below. To book a Heartland guest on your program, please contact Director of Communications Jim Lakely at media(at)heartland(dot)org and 312/377-4000 or (cell) 312/731-9364.

“I am truly sorry to see a ‘March for Science’ mixed up with all this. It is likely to hurt science and scientists by painting them as purely partisan and political.

“It will be portrayed as self-serving and money-grubbing. Any more noble motives will be buried and extremist views will be amplified, so I worry about adverse public reactions and their consequences.”

S. Fred Singer

Senior Fellow, Environment

The Heartland Institute

Director/Founder Science and Environmental Policy Project

sepp(at)his(dot)com

312/377-4000

“When I was a child, Earth Day was a day to take my little red wagon along the county highway I grew up on and pick up litter. Now it seems the politicization of every facet of our lives is complete. Anti-Trump demonstrations masked as a supposed ‘March for Science’ are planned in multiple cities across the country – although it is fair to question the dedication of these protesters to the pursuit of scientific truth instead of simply showing they are part of the #resistance.

“Despite the fact the Environmental Protection Agency did not produce any evidence that fracking has caused widespread or systemic impacts on groundwater, there will doubtless be anti-fracking protests at these marches. But any fair reading of the scientific data shows that hydraulic fracturing has been enormously beneficial for our economy and national security with small, manageable risks to the environment.

“The demonstrators should formulate their hypotheses about the world, but be open to changing their world view if observed data do not support their initial position.”

Isaac Orr

Research Fellow, Energy and Environment Policy

The Heartland Institute

iorr(at)heartland(dot)org

312/377-4000

“No matter what kind of march you schedule on a Saturday during baseball season, I’m going to ignore it. (That is, of course, unless it’s a march against the designated hitter or…

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