Bankruptcy Advice Every Consumer Should Know In Advance

Even when faced with dire financial consequences, many people fear the prospect of filing personal bankruptcy. The key to defeating what can, often be, crippling anxiety is familiarizing yourself with the process and its potential benefits. Use the tips in this article to alleviate your fears and do what is necessary to get a fresh financial start.

Trying to exclude family members you owe money to before filing for personal bankruptcy can get you into serious hot water. The court will look into who you pay-off as far as a year back, and if they find you showing favor to family over other creditors, they could invalidate your filing completely.

Don’t think of bankruptcy as the ruination of your financial future. Once your bankruptcy has been discharged, you can begin to work on re-building your credit right away. By continuing to make timely monthly payments and not applying for new credit, you can significantly raise your credit score within 6 months. And, if you maintain good credit for that amount of time, you may find it possible to get approval for loans to make large purchases, such as a home or car.

Know your rights when it comes to filing for personal bankruptcy. The last thing you need now, is a hassle from the legal professional that you hire to represent you. A few years ago, the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act was made into law, in order to protect financially strapped consumers from being ripped off. Beware and be informed!

Personal bankruptcy should be a last resort if you’re in insolvency. This is due to the fact that it will take years for the bankruptcy to work off your credit report and new law changes make it harder to escape paying the debts off. In other words, you could have bankruptcy on your credit report and still be paying off several of your debts.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.

Before deciding to file for bankruptcy, you may want to look into other options. Remember, when you file for bankruptcy, you are greatly hurting your credit score, which in turn, can prohibit you from buying a house, car, and other big purchases. Consider safer, alternative methods first, such as consumer credit counseling.

Once you determined that you want to file for bankruptcy, it is important that you figure out which kind is best for you to file. For instance, with Chapter 7 most of your debts will be relieved, and you can keep certain aspects. With Chapter 13 your debt gets reconstructed, and you are given a certain amount of time to pay it off.

Start taking calls from bill collectors. You may have been avoiding calls from bill collectors, but if you are filing bankruptcy you may need to speak to them. You need to have all of your debts laid out so that your lawyer can get to work involving them in your case. If you don’t include a debt, it will not be discharged, and you will still have to pay it.

The specter of personal bankruptcy is something countless individuals dread and strive to avoid, no matter what. The truth is that a little bit of knowledge goes a long way toward making bankruptcy a less mysterious, more accessible opportunity for those who need it. Apply the advice contained in this piece, and you may find that bankruptcy represents a good solution for your circumstances.

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